Sunday, September 14, 2008

NY Times: Palin wanted "to remove" "Daddy's Roomate" from the library

According to the page one story in today's NY Times, "Once Elected, Palin Hired Friends and Lashed Foes," Palin didn't like the book:
Witnesses and contemporary news accounts say Ms. Palin asked the librarian about removing books from the shelves. The McCain-Palin presidential campaign says Ms. Palin never advocated censorship.

But in 1995, Ms. Palin, then a city councilwoman, told colleagues that she had noticed the book “Daddy’s Roommate” on the shelves and that it did not belong there, according to Ms. Chase and Mr. Stein. Ms. Chase read the book, which helps children understand homosexuality, and said it was inoffensive; she suggested that Ms. Palin read it.

“Sarah said she didn’t need to read that stuff,” Ms. Chase said. “It was disturbing that someone would be willing to remove a book from the library and she didn’t even read it.”

“I’m still proud of Sarah,” she added, “but she scares the bejeebers out of me.”
Here's how Publisher's Weekly described it:
This picture book is an auspicious beginning to the Alyson Wonderland imprint, "which focuses on books for and about the children of lesbian and gay parents." That the venture is being undertaken is in itself commendable: consciousness-raising concerning gay issues can handily begin at an early age with the help of books such as Willhoite's. His text is suitably straightforward, and the format--single lines of copy beneath full-page illustrations--easily accessible to the intended audience. The story's narrator begins with his parents' divorce, and continues, "Now there's somebody new at Daddy's house." The new arrival is male; Frank and Daddy are seen pursuing their daily routine (eating, shaving, sleeping--even fighting), and on weekends the three interact easily on their various outings. "Mommy says Frank and Daddy are gay"--this new concept is explained to the child as "just one more kind of love." Willhoite's cartoony pictures work well here; the colorful characters with their contemporary wardrobes and familiar surroundings lend the tale a stabilizing air of warmth and familiarity. Ages 2-5.


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